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Singapore

Singapore

Singapore is a city-state in Southeast Asia. It’s one of the most expensive cities in the world. It’s also one of the cleanest. Jammed packed on this island country are tall skyscrapers, modern subways and a diverse population comprised of Chinese, Malay, Indian and expatriates from around the world. The climate is tropical meaning hot and humid most of the year. The language is primarily Mandarin and English. Because Singapore was once a British colony, almost all of the residents speak English or as what I understand to be “Singlish”.

Modern skyscrapers in Singapore

Modern skyscrapers along the Singapore bay.

Singapore Flyer

The Singapore Flyer

Marina Bay Sands in Singapore

Marina Bay Sands is one of the newest feature to the Singapore skyline and attraction.

Flats in Singapore

Residential flats in Singapore.

I’ve always wanted to visit Singapore. There was something about this city that attracted me. I knew nothing about it other than it was a clean city. I stopped by here in 1985 for a few days when my family migrated to the US by way of refugee sponsorship. I was only 5 years old and had faint memories of Singapore. It was not anything I saw today.

Singapore looked like New York City to me. The tall skyscrapers, fast taxis and diverse population reminded me too much of the US. One thing Singapore has that the US doesn’t have are the hawker centers.

Lau Pa Sat Festival Market in Raffle Quay Singapore.

Hawker centers are concentrated areas of food stalls or street foods that are affordable and delicious. There were many hawkers all over Singapore. The one I went to and absolutely love was Lau Pa Sat Festival Market in Raffle Quay or the financial district. This place was newly renovated and offered the most variety. These hawkers are government regulated so the standards and cleanliness is safe for the public.

Char kway teow is a flat rice noodle stir fried in beef and veggies. This is a Singaporean staple.

Char kway teow is a flat rice noodle stir fried in beef and veggies. This is a Singaporean staple.

Garlic Oysters

Garlic oysters can be found at hawkers in Singapore.

Morning Glory or ong choi is a very popular veggie dish stir fried in sambal.

Morning glory or ong choi is a very popular veggie dish stir fried in sambal.

Fried butter prawns are well known to Singapore hawker enthusiasts.

Fried butter prawns are well known to Singapore hawker enthusiasts.

Tip: Always BYON (Bring Your Own Napkins). Food is sold separately from beverages. That’s a totally different stall. Tipping is not required.

Behind Lau Pa Sat Festival Market is the famous satay street. It’s literally a street full of satay stalls from one end to the other. Each night, the street is filled with people hovering at a table eating satays, drinking beer and having a good time. Because Singapore is full of expats, this is a great place to people watch especially on a Friday night after work hours. Turn on your charm because those expats are smoking hot!

Street food in Singapore

Satay master showing off his skills.

Beef satay

Beef satay with veggies on the side.

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Each stick was equivalent to $0.75 a piece.

Grilled shrimp from the satay stalls in Singapore Lau Pa Sat

Grilled shrimp from the satay stalls.

Lau Pa Sat Satay Stalls

Lau Pa Sat hawker is located in the heart of the financial district. The satay stalls are located outdoor behind Lau Pa Sat.

There are lots to do in Singapore. Nature enthusiasts can visit the Botanical Garden, City in the Garden, or the beaches in Sentosa. One can visit the Marina Bay Sands for drinks on the rooftop overlooking the Singapore skyline at Ku De Ta bar or test their luck at the casino. City slickers could enjoy the bustle of the city by chilling inside the hundreds of coffee shops or experience ultimate retail therapy along Orchard Road filled with high-end shops and department stores. Night crawlers can sip on cocktails and dance the night away at Clarke Quay.

Clockwise: Coffee ginger, iced milk tea, mango smoothie and kopi C coffee.

Clockwise: Coffee ginger, iced milk tea, kopi C coffee and mango smoothie are some of Singapore’s popular drinks.

Orchard Road in Singapore

Spend the day shopping on Orchard Road.

The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands

More shopping at The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands.

There was so much to do in Singapore and 3 days was not enough. One thing I accomplished on this trip was indulge in food paradise. After all, Singapore is a food city. I tried staples such as chili crab, fried carrot cake, satay, fried Hokkien mee, katong laksa and chicken rice. There were a million other staples I couldn’t have gotten to in only 3 days. Check out these 40 Singapore must-try foods if you plan on visiting this food mecca.

Singapore chili crab is made of a sweet and spicy sauce blended with garlic and eggs smothered on steamed crabs.

Singapore chili crab is made of a sweet and spicy sauce blended with garlic, palm sugar, chili, spices and beaten eggs smothered on fresh steamed crabs. Dab this sauce on white rice or soak it up with bread and you are in food heaven.

Fried carrot cake is an Asian radish cake stir fried in eggs and dark soy sauce.

Carrot cake or chai tow kuay is an Asian radish cake stir fried in eggs and dark soy sauce.

Beef satay is a famous street food in Singapore.

Beef satay is a famous street food in Singapore.

Fried Hokkien mee is a cruncky egg noodle served in a gravy-like sauce with meat and veggies.

Fried Hokkien mee is a cruncky egg noodle served in a gravy-like sauce with meat and veggies.

Katong laksa is a noodle soup with thick vermicelli, spicy coconut gravy and served with fried fish patties.

Katong laksa is a noodle soup with thick vermicelli, spicy coconut gravy and served with fried fish patties or similar items.

Chicken rice is the most popular Singaporean staple.

Chicken rice is the most popular Singaporean staple.

I don’t regret the short time I spent in Singapore. I enjoyed every moment of it. The linger to see more and eat more only leaves room for a second trip in the near future.

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